Tuesday, March 17, 2020

Free Essays on A Constructivist Pedagogy For Career And Technology Education

In this article, I explored tenets of constructivism that could be directly applied to the Career and Technology Education Standards for Career and Technology Education Teachers. This article provides a proposed constructivist pedagogy for the Vocational Technology studies. Though I do not consider myself to be a strict- constructivist teacher, when I compared my educational philosophy to this proposed pedagogy, I realized how much the study of constructivist theory and practice had influenced my beliefs and methods of instruction. As a future Technology Education educator, I applied these constructivist principles to my own teaching style and methods. A Constructivist Pedagogy for Career and Technology Education The National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium states: â€Å"career studies should be taught in manners that are consistent with a constructivist view of learning† (NASDCTEC, 1999, p. 7). While this may sound good in theory, one underlying problem exists: the lack of a clearly defined, agreed-upon constructivist pedagogy. This article will (1) explore the definition and variations of constructivist theory, (2) present a pedagogy for constructivist teachers of career and technology studies, and (3) compare and relate those pedagogies to the existing standards for powerful career and technology studies as defined by the NASDCTEC. Defining Constructivism â€Å"Constructivism is a topic on the conference programs of virtually all prominent national educational organizations and has been widely described and analyzed in professional journals† (Brooks, 1999). Constructivist theory has been presented in a variety of contexts, and institutions of higher education are implementing constructivist teacher education programs nationwide (Brooks, 1999). So, what exactly is constructivism? The answer is not clear, and depending upon different researchers, authors, or theorists,... Free Essays on A Constructivist Pedagogy For Career And Technology Education Free Essays on A Constructivist Pedagogy For Career And Technology Education In this article, I explored tenets of constructivism that could be directly applied to the Career and Technology Education Standards for Career and Technology Education Teachers. This article provides a proposed constructivist pedagogy for the Vocational Technology studies. Though I do not consider myself to be a strict- constructivist teacher, when I compared my educational philosophy to this proposed pedagogy, I realized how much the study of constructivist theory and practice had influenced my beliefs and methods of instruction. As a future Technology Education educator, I applied these constructivist principles to my own teaching style and methods. A Constructivist Pedagogy for Career and Technology Education The National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium states: â€Å"career studies should be taught in manners that are consistent with a constructivist view of learning† (NASDCTEC, 1999, p. 7). While this may sound good in theory, one underlying problem exists: the lack of a clearly defined, agreed-upon constructivist pedagogy. This article will (1) explore the definition and variations of constructivist theory, (2) present a pedagogy for constructivist teachers of career and technology studies, and (3) compare and relate those pedagogies to the existing standards for powerful career and technology studies as defined by the NASDCTEC. Defining Constructivism â€Å"Constructivism is a topic on the conference programs of virtually all prominent national educational organizations and has been widely described and analyzed in professional journals† (Brooks, 1999). Constructivist theory has been presented in a variety of contexts, and institutions of higher education are implementing constructivist teacher education programs nationwide (Brooks, 1999). So, what exactly is constructivism? The answer is not clear, and depending upon different researchers, authors, or theorists,...

Sunday, March 1, 2020

15 Frequently Confused Pairs of Adjectives

15 Frequently Confused Pairs of Adjectives 15 Frequently Confused Pairs of Adjectives 15 Frequently Confused Pairs of Adjectives By Mark Nichol Some of these similar-looking words do have, among various meanings, the same sense, but their primary definitions are quite different. Know these distinctions: 1. ambiguous/ambivalent: To be ambiguous is be able to be understood in more than one way (or, less commonly, of uncertain identity); to be ambivalent is to express uncertainty or contradictory opinions. (The latter term is also distinct from indifferent, which implies a lack of opinion or concern.) 2. alternate/alternative: To be alternate is to occur by turns or in a pattern that skips from one side to the other, or to provide another possibility; to be alternative is to offer a choice, or to be a variation from a norm. 3. abstruse/obtuse: Something abstruse is, because of complexity, something not easily comprehended; something obtuse is unclear because or careless or imprecise information. (Obtuse also describes someone who is dull or insensitive, or an object that is blunt or round, and alternatively refers to an angle greater than 90 degrees.) 4. arrant/errant: Arrant means â€Å"immoderate† or â€Å"extreme†; errant means â€Å"traveling† or â€Å"being aimless, or â€Å"straying† or â€Å"misbehaving.† 5. celibate/chaste: A celibate person is one who abstains from sex or marriage; chaste is a synonym but can also mean â€Å"modest† or even â€Å"spotless† or â€Å"austere.† 6. climatic/climactic: Climatic refers to climate; climactic applies to a climax. 7. concerted/concentrated: Something concerted has been conducted in a coordinated manner; concentrated means â€Å"focused† in the sense of organizing toward a common goal. 8. desirable/desirous: Something desirable is attractive or advantageous; desirous refers to being driven by desire. 9. disinterested/uninterested: Both terms can mean â€Å"apathetic,† but disinterested also has the sense of â€Å"neutral.† 10. drastic/dramatic: Drastic means â€Å"extreme†; dramatic refers to something suggestive of drama, or emphatic. 11. exceptional/exceptionable: Something exceptional is superior, or rare (it is also employed to refer to those with mental or physical abilities); something exceptionable is offensive or undesirable people take exception to it. 12. extended/extensive: Extended means â€Å"lengthened† (though it is also sometimes used as a synonym for extensive); extensive means â€Å"to a great degree† or â€Å"of a great magnitude.† 13. forceful/forcible: To be forceful is to be strong or persuasive; something forcible is accomplished by using force (though it can mean â€Å"powerful,† too). Forced, meanwhile, refers to involuntary action or something done only with effort. 14. ironic/sarcastic: An ironic statement is one meant to be understood as meaning something other than its literal meaning indicates; a sarcastic statement can be ironic, but the word sarcastic generally refers to something said facetiously to express ridicule. 15. luxurious/luxuriant: Something luxurious is resplendent in luxury; something luxuriant is fertile and lush, though the word may also be used as a synonym for luxurious. Want to improve your English in five minutes a day? Get a subscription and start receiving our writing tips and exercises daily! Keep learning! Browse the Misused Words category, check our popular posts, or choose a related post below:Good At, Good In, and Good With50 Nautical Terms in General UseShore It Up

Friday, February 14, 2020

Article review on a Revised British COnstitution Essay

Article review on a Revised British COnstitution - Essay Example cular importance because Blair’s proposal were seen as highly significant as the Britain is a unitary state with all centralized power vested on the central government not having much transparency in its working processes. The article primarily discusses seven major constitutional proposals of the Blair government which it intended to reform and implement. They are devolution of Scotland and Wales; election of Mayor of London and major urban areas; removal of voting rights of hereditary peers in the House of Lords; incorporation of European human rights into British laws; freedom of information acts; electoral reforms at various level of government and referendum on changing the electoral system for member of parliament; and legislation for separate Supreme Court as independent judicial authority and stable government in northern Ireland. The Blair government was able to make significant inroad into the major constitutional reform proposals and help form stable governments in Scotland and wale after devolution. Even the problem of Northern Ireland, beset with internal violence, was relatively sorted out. Decentralization of power to local councils and mayors and right to information went a long way in creating transparency in government work. Referendums were held to encourage and promote public participation in government decision making were hailed as highly popular mechanism. The one area that became controversial was the reforms in the electoral system whereby though ‘single member district system would be retained but instead of casting a vote for one person only, electorate would rank candidates in order of preference, thus assuring majority rather than a plurality of vote for the winner’. The reform came under a lot of flak from major political parties because the constitutional reform had undermined their political supremacy over the smaller political parties with regional interests. Even the labor party members had shown their resentment against

Saturday, February 1, 2020

The Carter Administration and the Evolution of American Nuclear Essay

The Carter Administration and the Evolution of American Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy - Essay Example Should one continue to play in the field to make sure that it is kept regulated Or should one insist on the moral high ground and stay away from an arena where the evil is both patent and inherent No other world leader has been hounded by this question more than Jimmy Carter, whose regime has seen the evolution of the American Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. Though his good faith and commitment to his advocacy have remained unquestioned, many have voiced their opposition over a nuclear containment strategy that effectively cuts off US engagement from other States with respect to the development of nuclear arsenal, and restricts technology transfer with the end in view of achieving nuclear nonproliferation. It is submitted, however, that Carter is not to blame for the failure of his policies. The larger political landscape - both internal and external - must be examined. If at all, Carter must be lauded for boldly extricating the discourse of nuclear weapons from the neither-here-nor-there language of political ambiguity. His fierce and uncompromising condemnation of nuclear weapons has found resonance all over the world, and continues to affect American foreign policy, one A merican President after another. The history of American policy on nuclear weapons is indeed a colorful and protracted one. After the Second World War ended, the Soviet Union began the nuclear race. Desirous of preventing the Soviets from amassing nuclear arsenal, the US encouraged its allies to explore its nuclear capabilities as well. However, the infamous nuclear testing conducted by France radically altered policy and nonproliferation became the avowed goal. The Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty was entered into by the administration of Lyndon Johnson. However, it was a secondary issue for all intents and purposes. America was made complacent by the absence of threats. When India detonated a nuclear device in 1984, a paradigm shift took place. Nonproliferation suddenly became an important issue. Then President Nixon gave word that he would supply nuclear reactors to Egypt and Israel so they may develop their own nuclear capabilities. Many raised fears, valid fears, that this would only lead to the unabated spread of nuclear weapons and it would reach a point when regulation would be next to impossible. Comes now Jimmy Carter, riding on the crescent wave of anti-nuclear weapon advocates. In his campaign, he always gave special importance to the issue of nuclear weapons. He knew why he wanted to do it - because the anti-nuclear weapons advocacy was at the core human rights issue, and how he would do it - by prohibiting the commercial reprocessing and recycling of plutonium used in the creation of nuclear weapons. By arresting the technology transfer, Carter believed that he was paving the way for nuclear containment. This was a radical and total departure from the policies of Nixon on Ford, who believed in strategic engagement, even a little muscle-flexing, when the need arises. His was a complete declaration of war against nuclear weapons; not the case-to-case basis policy of previous regimes. Much opposition was generated by Carter's policy. In the strong words of Sen. Pete Domenici, a Republican from New Mexico, " a strategy of nonproliferation based solely on denial of equipment and technology will at most only delay, not prohibit this possibility." The legislature also

Friday, January 24, 2020

Turns and Twists in Flannery OConnors A Good Man Is Hard to Find Essa

Turns and Twists in Flannery O'Connor's A Good Man Is Hard to Find Irony is a useful tool for giving stories unexpected turns and twists. In Flannery O'Connor's "A Good Man Is Hard to Find," irony is used as a very effective literary tool; to guide the story in and out of what we think will happen. O'Connor uses irony in this story to contradict statements and situations to expose a truth very much different from what "we" the reader would think to be true. O'Connor use irony in several different forms, situational irony, dramatic irony and verbal irony to make the story unpredictable and interesting to read. In most every aspect of the story from beginning to end there is some type of ironic twist. The title itself is some what ironic, where in a normal society a "good man" would be seen as a man that obeys laws and is kind to fellow humans not as a murderer and an escaped convict like the Misfit. But the grandmother in the story while her family is being taken way to be killed says, using verbal irony, "I know you're a good man ... You're not a bit common (335)." The main character in the story is the grandmother in which O'Connor uses her for almost every ironic situation. In the beginning of the story O'Connor uses the idea that "we" the reader have of what a grandmother would be like to unfold a story that is nothing like what "we" would perceive a grandmother to be like. This type of irony is situational irony; this is used throughout the story and literature. It is the contrast between what happens and what was expected to happen or what would seem appropriate to have happen, or an appropriate way for a character to act versus the way they do act. If a story started out using a character that's a professiona... ... She uses cosmic irony; a type of irony that goes beyond being unfair and is morally tragic, as the main setting for the story, you may not be able to see it right away but the undertone are there. Such irony is often so harsh that it causes people to question God, like the grandmother does near the end of the story, "'That's when you should have started to pray...If you would pray,' the old lady said, `Jesus would help you. (336-337)" The irony in this story reaches such a tragic state that as expected it may suggest to the characters in the story and even the reader that people could just be pawns in the hands of mysterious forces or fate. Works Cited: O'Connor, Flannery "A Good Man Is Hard to Find." Making Literature Matter: An Anthology for Readers and Writers. Ed. John Schilb and John Clifford. 2nd ed. Boston: Bedford/ St. Martin's. 2003. 1379-1391.

Thursday, January 16, 2020

Employment and Interviewer Essay

Ask a random selection of people for a listing of their least favorite activities, and right up there with â€Å"getting my teeth drilled† is likely to be â€Å"going to a job interview.† The job interview is often regarded as a confusing, humiliating, and nerve-racking experience. First of all, you have to wait for your appointment in an outer room, often trapped there with other people applying for the same job. You sit nervously, trying not to think about the fact that only one of you may be hired. Then you are called into the interviewer’s office. Faced with a complete stranger, you have to try to act both cool and friendly as you are asked all sorts of questions. Some questions are personal: â€Å"What is your greatest weakness?† Others are confusing: â€Å"Why should we hire you?† The interview probably takes about twenty minutes but seems like two hours. Finally, you go home and wait for days and even weeks. If you get the job, great. But if you don’t, you’re rarely given any reason why. 2 The job-interview â€Å"game† may not be much fun, but it is a game you can win if you play it right. The name of the game is standing out of the crowd—in a positive way. If you go to the interview in a Bozo the Clown suit, you’ll stand out of the crowd, all right, but not in a way that is likely to get you hired. 3 Here are guidelines to help you play the interview game to win: 4 Present yourself as a winner. Instantly, the way you dress, speak, and move gives the interviewer more information about you than you would think possible. You doubt that this is true? Consider this: a professional job recruiter, meeting a series of job applicants, was asked to signal the moment he decided not to hire each applicant. The thumbs-down decision was often made in less than forty-five seconds—even before the applicant thought the interview had begun. 5 How can you keep from becoming a victim of an instant â€Å"no† decision? * Dress appropriately. This means business clothing: usually a suit and tie or a conservative dress or skirt suit. Don’t wear casual student clothing. On the other hand, don’t overdress: you’re going to a job interview, not a party. If you’re not sure what’s considered appropriate business attire, do some spying before the interview. Walk past your prospective place of employment at lunch or quitting time and check out how the employees are dressed. Your goal is to look as though you would fit in with that group of people. * Pay attention to your grooming. Untidy hair, body odor, dandruff, unshined shoes, a hanging hem, stains on your tie, excessive makeup or cologne, a sloppy job of shaving—if the interviewer notices any of these, your prospect of being hired takes a probably fatal hit. * Look alert, poised, and friendly. When that interviewer looks into the waiting room and calls your name, he or she is getting a first impression of your behavior. If you’re slouched in your chair, dozing or lost in the pages of a magazine; if you look up with an annoyed â€Å"Huh?†; if you get up slowly and wander over with your hands in your pockets, he or she will not be favorably impressed. What will earn you points is rising promptly and walking briskly toward the interviewer. Smiling and looking directly at that person, extend your hand to shake his or hers, saying, â€Å"I’m Lesley Brown. Thank you for seeing me today.† * Expect to make a little small talk. This is not a waste of time; it is the interviewer’s way of checking your ability to be politely sociable, and it is your opportunity to cement the good impression you’ve already made. The key is to follow the interviewer’s lead. If he or she wants to chat about the weather for a few minutes, do so. But don’t drag it out; as soon as you get a signal that it’s time to talk about the job, be ready to get down to business. Be ready for the interviewer’s questions. The same questions come up again and again in many job interviews. You should plan ahead for all these questions! Think carefully about each question, outline your answer, and memorize each outline. Then practice reciting the answers to yourself. Only in this way are you going to be prepared. Here are common questions, what they really mean, and how to answer them: * â€Å"Tell me about yourself.† This question is raised to see how organized you are. The wrong way to answer it is to launch into a wandering, disjointed response or—worse yet—to demand defensively, â€Å"What do you want to know?† or â€Å"What do you mean?† When this question comes up, you should be prepared to give a brief summary of your life and work experience—where you grew up, where your family lives now, where you went to school, what jobs you’ve had, and how you happen to be here now looking for the challenge of a new job. * â€Å"What are your strengths and weaknesses?† In talking about your strong points, mention traits that will serve you well in this particular job. If you are well organized, a creative problem-solver, a good team member, or a quick learner, be ready to describe specific ways those strengths have served you in the past. Don’t make the mistake of saying, â€Å"I don’t have any real weaknesses.† You’ll come across as more believable if you admit a flaw—but make it one that an employer might actually like. For instance, admit that you are a workaholic or a perfectionist. * â€Å"Why should we hire you?† Remember that it is up to you to convince the interviewer that you’re the man or woman for this job. If you just sit there and hope that the interviewer will magically discern your good qualities, you are likely to be disappointed. Don’t be afraid to sell yourself. Tell the recruiter that from your research you have learned that the interviewer’s company is one you would like to work for, and that you believe the company’s needs and your skills are a great match. * â€Å"Why did you leave your last job?† This may seem like a great opportunity to cry on the interviewer’s shoulder about what a jerk your last boss was or how unappreciated you were. It is not. The experts agree: never bad-mouth anyone when you are asked this question. Say that you left in order to seek greater responsibilities or challenges. Be positive, not negative. No matter how justified you may feel about hating your last job or boss, if you give voice to those feelings in an interview, you’re going to make the interviewer suspect that you’re a whiner and hard to work with. * â€Å"Do you have any questions?† This is the time to stress one last time how interested you are in this particular job. Ask a question or two about specific aspects of the job, pointing out again how well your talents and the company’s needs are matched. Even if you’re dying to know how much the job pays and how much vacation you get, don’t ask. There will be time enough to cover those questions after you’ve been offered the job. Today, your task is to demonstrate what a good employee you would be. 7 Send a thank-you note. Once you’ve gotten past the interview, there is one more chance for you to make a fine impression. As soon as you can—certainly no more than one or two days after the interview—write a note of thanks to your interviewer. In it, briefly remind him or her of when you came in and what job you applied for. As well as thanking the interviewer for seeing you, reaffirm your interest in the job and mention again why you think you are the best candidate for it. Make the note courteous, businesslike, and brief—just a paragraph or two. If the interviewer is wavering between several equally qualified candidates, such a note could tip the scales in your favor. No amount of preparation is going to make interviewing for a job your favorite activity. But if you go in well-prepared and with a positive attitude, your potential employer can’t help thinking highly of you. And the day will come when you are the one who wins the job.

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

Title Ix And Its Impact On American Sports - 2369 Words

Title IX consists of just thirty-seven words, and it is these words that have transformed the dynamics within the female athletic sphere in the United States. Although the federal law was initially envisioned to assist women in academia, it is currently renowned for its profound impact on American sports (Ware). It is an irrefutable fact that Title IX has vastly increased women’s participation in sports: the law has reportedly increased female participation rates within colleges six-fold from 1972—the year it was passed—to today (Cooky). Opportunities for women in sports have never been greater. However, despite the progress made by Title IX, it faces deep challenges in its quest to achieve true equality. Women’s participation rates in sports still lag far behind men, and one cannot ignore this disturbing reality (â€Å"National Coalition†). Thus, the question as to whether or not Title IX has achieved gender equity is highly debatable. This paper i ntends to understand the shortcomings of Title IX’s goal in attaining true equality through analysis of its limitations. Specifically, this essay will explore women’s history in sports prior to Title IX, the importance of sports for females, an overview of Title IX’s statute, and an analysis of the law’s various issues. To narrow the scope of my essay, I will focus mainly on intercollegiate sports. Historical Attitudes Pre-Title IX Prior to the passing of Title IX in 1972, women were generally not appreciated in the world ofShow MoreRelatedTaking a Look at Title IX1864 Words   |  7 Pagescompetitor and have a passion for sports. This is a feeling that many females felt before Title IX; was explicated to give female’s gender equality in sports. Title IX has positively affected women’s sports over the years, but can negatively impact men’s teams, especially within the collegiate field. Title IX has changed budgeting and participation numbers between males and females, while opening up several opportunities for women. I am going to inform you how Title IX affects females and males in collegiateRead MoreTitle IX’s Lasting Effects1369 Words   |  6 PagesIt is also important to examine the impacts of Title IX on racial diversity as well, not only gender diversity. In 1972, it was reported that 30% of white girls and women were playing sports which increased to 40% after the passage o f Title IX (Picket et. all, 2012). Participation levels among black women have actually decreased from 35% in 1972 to only 27% in 2002 (Picket et. all, 2012). This leads to the conclusion that in 1972 Black women played more sports then their White counterparts, and sinceRead More Title IX and Impacts on Womens Education Essay examples1160 Words   |  5 PagesTitle IX and the impacts on women and their education HISTORY: Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 is the landmark legislation that bans sex discrimination in schools, whether it is in academics or athletics. Title IX states: No person in the U.S. shall, on the basis of sex be excluded from participation in, or denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any educational program or activity receiving federal aid. Athletics has created the most controversy regardingRead MoreTitle Ix : An Important Part Of The American Culture811 Words   |  4 PagesTitle IX Sports have an important part in the American culture. Today’s ratio of girls in high school who take part in sports is 1 in 3. In 1970, the ratio was only 1 in 27. Now some of the greatest rising sport stars are women. Americans didn’t believe girls and women could play sports such as basketball, rugby, soccer, and many more. Basically girls and women were underestimated due to the fact America thought they couldn’t play a sport that a boy or man could play. The Educational AmendmentsRead MoreTitle IX on Sexual and Race Discrimination1366 Words   |  6 Pages Research paper Title IX What if you were told that there may be a law created intended to remove discrimination between the sexes in education and sports, or that in the matter of athletics and job occupations both men and women are given equal opportunities? Would you then agree or disagree with the ideology that both sexes are still treated different even though this law was created and the opportunities that were promised aren’t precisely indistinguishable? Title IX is not an accurate protectionRead MoreCritique of Title IX1136 Words   |  5 Pagessexes in sports and education, or that man and woman are both given equal opportunities as far as an athletic or educational career? Would you then agree or disagree with the ideology that both sexes are still treated different even though this law was created and the opportunities that were promised aren’t precisely indistinguishable? Title IX does not accurately protect sexual discrimination; it doesnt give equal opportunities, and is unjust as far as benefits between male and female sports. AlthoughRead MoreTitle IX Thesis973 Words   |  4 PagesWhile Title IX is often thought of â€Å"the women’s sports bill†, the history and progression of Title IX suggests a far more complex history. In fact, as Amanda Ross Edwards suggests, Title IX’s shift was reaction to public conflict about the bill that was spurred after the bill’s creation. The conflicts surrounding the development of Title IX suggests that debates about who should be included in educational spaces and who should be excluded from those spaces did not cease upon the Brown vs. Board ofRead MoreConflicting Arguments Over Title IX Legislation925 Words   |  4 Pagesgymnastics programs (Gottesdiener, 2011). Organizations like this are being diminished and discarded at an ever-increasing rate all across America. College and high school students competing in these athletic events are truly passionate about their chosen sport. In many cases, promising athletes are offered scholarships, initiating a symbiotic relationship between the student and the school they play for. In 1972, a new legislation was put forward with the intent of leveling the school-sponsored playing fieldRead MoreTitle IX: Nix the Nine1354 Words   |  5 PagesTitle IX is a controversial law that has raised many conflicts with colleges and other federal funded establishments. Title IX has had a long controversial history throughout America and has been the focal point of many court cases. Among these court cases women have believed that this law has only affected women’s athletics in a positive way and has not affected men’s athletics in a negative way at all. Although Title IX has affected women’s athletics in a positive way it has, at the same time,Read MoreEqual Pay Act And Title Ix1485 Words   |  6 PagesIt is the year 2016, the United States has had its first African American president, gay marriage is legalized, a nd women and men are supposedly seen as equals in the workplace and educational institutions. It is important to note that while steps to equality have been made through the Equal Pay Act and Title IX, gender discrimination is still prevalent in society. The NCAA reported since 1988, in the 2007-2008 academic year, institutions yielded a net gain of 2, 342 women’s teams added to varsity